News about Exceptionalities, Giftedness, and More

From the July/August, 2017, issue of 2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter

OUTSIDE-THE-BOX THINKING benefits both the student and the school. Parent, advocate and author Amanda Marin writes at Education Week about a success story yes, success – for a twice-exceptional student at the hands of a creative school administration and staff. The story involves a teacher frustrated by her inability to understand the student in question... a social worker... and a hard-working IEP team, all backed by a school principal who encouraged collaboration and innovative thinking. Find the story

HERE'S WHAT WE NEED MORE OF – scholarships available to students at private, 2e-friendly schools. FlexSchool has awarded a student at its New Haven, Connecticut, campus a scholarship valued at half of the tuition for the student's high school tenure. The William Morse Scholarship is named in honor of a mentor to FlexSchool's founder, Jacqui Byrne. Read more about the scholarship and its inaugural recipient. 

STANDARD TEST ACCOMMODATIONS. In The Hechinger Report, a young man writes about being refused extra time in a state test that is the gateway to a prestigious scholarship competition. He is multi-exceptional, and makes exceptional use of analogies and metaphors in his arguments for accommodations in such testing. For example: "Does a person who needs glasses have an unfair advantage over someone who does not?" The author also confronted the testing body on a number of issues and received responses unsatisfactory to him... or received no response at all. The young man is already a great advocate for himself and for other 2e students. Find the article

DON'T FEEL BAD if you had trouble figuring out what was going on with your 2e kiddo before you knew he was twice-exceptional. At the Huffington Postyou can read about a family in which the two parents have a combined three advanced degrees in education – but who went through the same puzzle-solving most of the rest of us did before encountering, for the first time, the term "twice-exceptional." And the mom transitioned into a role familiar to those here: “warrior-research mother.” Find the story

LABELS FOR DIFFERENTLY-WIRED KIDS. TiLT Parenting pointed us to an essay by a mom in Singapore who with her family this summer "will traverse twelve time zones to the other side of the globe as a step towards acceptance." In the family is a very bright 7yo differently-wired boy who on the trip will receive an assessment. The essay is in the form of a letter to the boy's teacher and is titled "Please Don't Label My Son." And the "acceptance part of the journey? "If we are to 'help' my son — accept and embrace him with empathy and unconditional love — we must learn to quiet the noise of our interpretations so that we can understand the nuances of his." Find the essay

AUSTIN SCHOOLS AND DYSLEXIA. The Austin, Texas, school district is making a special effort to identify and service students with dyslexia, according to the city's American Statesman news outlet. During the past school year, the school provided intervention services to about 8,600 students with dyslexia, this after admitting "We were missing a lot of kids." The number of students now served represents over 10 percent of the students in the district. Read more

THE DARK SIDE OF GIFTEDNESS. Are gifted individuals more prone to suicide? That's the question that an institute at the College of William and Mary will be attempting to answer, given the lack of prior research and data pertaining to the question. Tracy Cross, the executive director of the Center for Gifted Education at William and Mary, will lead the effort. Find out more

TO BE GIFTED AND LEARNING DISABLED, the 3rd edition, is now available from Prufrock Press. The three authors are Susan Baum, Robin Schader, and Steven Own. Those in the 2e community may use a code for 20% off the price of the book on the Prufrock site. Go to the book's page and then enter code TBGLD20 at checkout to receive the discount.

EDUCATION POLICY AND LAW. Disability Scoop reports this: "Less than half of states are meeting their obligations to appropriately serve students with disabilities under the nation’s special education law." You can find out if your state meets its obligations in the Disability Scoop article. Separately, if you're looking for a brief (60-second) summary of what the current administration's plans for the U.S. education budget are, Education Week has just what you're looking for.

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