News from the Blog — Thursday, November 20, 2014

In this blog we include items on giftedness, exceptionalities, parenting, education, and child development.

2e I. Jen the blogger has a nice piece at Laughing at Chaos titled "To Be Both Normal and Extraordinary." She muses on the dual nature of 2e kids -- extraordinary but normal -- and how "the only way our kids, all of our kids, are going to thrive is if we celebrate their extraordinariness while we simultaneously treat it as the most normal thing in the world." Find the blog

2e II. Eric Parsons, at the site of the Center for Talent Development writes about "non-normative behaviors." Recognize those? The gifted behaviors? The LD-based behaviors? The "nerd" label? The "outsider" feeling? He notes a sliver lining, how "Through linguistic re-appropriation and public forums unconstrained by geography, robust communities of self identified ‘nerds’, ‘geeks’, ‘weirdos’ etc. have developed around one key principle: enthusiastically pursuing and sharing interests without regard for prevailing socio-cultural norms." In other words, as Jen said above, "normal." Find the post

2e III. "Why We Should Stop Worrying if Other People Like Our Kids" is a Huffington Post blog by Lisa Abeyta, mother of two 2e kids, which she says is "is usually a daily adventure into the unknown, especially when a child is young -- because the exceptionalities are rarely identified. leaving parents a bit off kilter as they struggle to understand their child's unique approach to life." She tells a very uncomfortable story -- very uncomfortable to any parent -- in which she does something any parent will cheer. She writes, " I have... come to understand that it is so not my job to make my kid feel defective because he doesn't fit in the right box," and she has stopped worrying whether others are comfortable around her kid. Find the post

SCOOPED! We just finished writing up an NAGC session we attended by Matthew Fugate of Purdue University. The topic: giftedness, ADHD, and creativity. But Scott Barry Kaufman, writing at the site ofScientific American, has already addressed the study by Fugate that was core to his presentation. Here's the Kaufmann article -- but we'll add some details in our session write-up, coming soon. 

EXERCISE AND ADHD. We've blogged recently about the positive effects of exercise on cognitive functioning. An article at the site of the Child Mind Institute reflects on the results of one of those studies.Find the article.

ADHD AND MARKETING. A researcher describes five reasons for the global surge in ADHD diagnosis. Of the five, three have to do with "marketing." Read more.

"OWNING" DYSLEXIA. The organization Understood presents a webinar on Friday the 21st at noon ET titled "Why It's Important to Help Kids 'Own' Their Dyslexia." Find out more.

CONFERENCE TIP. A steadfast member of the 2e community suggests that readers here might be interested in the International Conference on Thinking, scheduled for June 29 through July 3, 2015, in Spain. She says, "There is a strong education strand and some excellent speakers: Howard Gardner, Robert Sternberg, Edward De Bono, David Perkins, Robert Swartz, Art Costa, and many more." Find out more.

AND FINALLY, THIS -- FOR YOU. That's right, for you gifted parents or educators or counselors of the gifted. A 40-year longitudinal study indicates that profoundly gifted men and women measure success differently by the time they reach mid-life. Results of the study, from Vanderbilt University, show how the men and women have achieved, spent their careers, been paid, spent their time, and "invested" in family. So see how your peers report in on their lives. (Although you, O Gifted Reader, may be somewhat younger than the roughly 50 years of age enjoyed by the study participants.)

Find all past blog entries at 2enewsletter.blogspot.com.